The Future of Food – What’s Next?

The main aspects of our food purchases are taste and price, but what else drives us to buy? There has been an increase in the “good-for-you” category – think chia pods, kale chips, activated almonds, drinkable quinoa and sprouted buckwheat cereal. Food marketers and consumer trend analysts say that Australians are becoming increasingly concerned about […]

The main aspects of our food purchases are taste and price, but what else drives us to buy?

There has been an increase in the “good-for-you” category – think chia pods, kale chips, activated almonds, drinkable quinoa and sprouted buckwheat cereal. Food marketers and consumer trend analysts say that Australians are becoming increasingly concerned about where their food is coming from more than ever. 

We are also more conscious about sugar, particularly in cereals and we want to eat more fresh fruits and vegetables.

But…we want convenience, like real convenience, such as readymade frozen meals, microwavable 90 second oats, DeliverooTM, squeezable yoghurt, powdered egg whites and pre-chopped veggies.

Millennials on the other hand are less likely to buy cereals for brekkie as they don’t want to wash the bowl! In fact, the no.1 selling cereal product now is “Up and GoTM” – a liquid breakfast.

So what are the top 10 food trends we’ll be seeing more of?

 

  1. Just walk out technology (Amazon go): Scan your Amazon card upon entering the supermarket, choose what you want and just walk out. No lines, no checkout.
  2. Voice activated shopping: Just talk to your speaker at home and Amazon’s Alexa will order your food and groceries for you.
  3. Personalised products: You can design your own bespoke muesli online at Mix my muesli, but it comes at a price; $30/ kilo vs $8/kilo for Woolworths own brand.
  4. Order your groceries from the fridge (Smart fridge): “If the kitchen is the centre of the home, the fridge is the centre of the kitchen” Samsung and LG have released fridges with a giant touch screen to order groceries and food.
  5. Convenience is king; breakfast biscuits, frozen meals, liquid breakfasts and heat and eat rice packets. Cereal in a bowl is so last year as time pressure continues to dominate what we eat for breakfast – it’s now breakfast biscuits or toast in one hand, phone in the other. Breakfast is the meal with the strictest time pressure (we have to get out the door to work) and is also the meal we spend the least $ on.
  6. Local food cooking: Forget DeliverooTM and FoodoraTM. This is real home cooked food ordered online from home cooks in your local area. E.g. Foods by us
  7. Rise of apps: Foodswitch app which allows consumers to scan food products and gives them a traffic light to indicate how healthy that food is.
  8. Online shopping: Steadily increasing, e.g. around 25% of Woolworths shoppers use online shopping, but people still like to visit in store and there’s also the BOPIS trend, Buy Online, Pick up In Store on the way home.
  9. A shift to Aldi: Consumers used to be embarrassed to admit they shopped at Aldi – now it’s seen as “smart”. Consumers can save up to $80 per basket of food when shopping at Aldi compared to Woolworths or Coles. Also, many private label* products (previously perceived as inferior) are actually produced in same factories as the branded ones. People are being overwhelmed by the choice offered at the large supermarkets so are shifting to Aldi – who wants to spend their life deciding which tuna to buy!?

*”Private label/supermarket brands are those manufactured by another company but sold under the supermarket’s own brands, and include the brands Coles, Woolworths Select or Aldi’s bespoke brands”.

  1. Digital supermarkets: The whole supermarket experience is transformed into a learning, interactive and automated market style approach. Not sure which avocado to pick? Let the bot choose the ripe one.

References:

Aldi has the cheapest grocery basket in Australia, Choice survey finds, SMH 6 June, 2017
Choice analysis of supermarket prices 5 June, 2017
DAA Corporate Nutrition Interest Group, June 2017
IPSOS, Food CHATs (Consumption, Habits, Attitudes and Trends) report 2016

 

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