What’s really in those take away lunches

Addicted to takeaway Australians eat out about 4 times a week (restaurants, cafes and takeaway) which represents around a third of the weekly food spend. As our lives get busier and we become time poor, spend on meals out increases. Cooking at home is often healthier than eating out, as home-cooked meals usually contain less […]

Addicted to takeaway

Australians eat out about 4 times a week (restaurants, cafes and takeaway) which represents around a third of the weekly food spend. As our lives get busier and we become time poor, spend on meals out increases.

Cooking at home is often healthier than eating out, as home-cooked meals usually contain less sugar and fat. Takeaway food is often high in calories, fat and refined carbohydrates and portion sizes are way out of control. There are better takeaway options to choose – check out our quick guide to help you navigate the food court.

Takeaway foods: Some healthier options

Instead of   Choose
Pad Thai Energy dense and high in sodium Beef and veggie stir fry
Muffin High in sugar and fat Fresh fruit and nuts
Jam on white toast High in refined sugar and low in protein Mashed up avo and boiled eggs on rye toast
White pasta with creamy sauce High in refined carbohydrates and fat Soup and tapas
Pizza/burger High in saturated fat, sodidum and refined carbohydrates Grilled chicken on rye bread with a salad
Chips on the side High in unhealthy polyunsaturated fats Salad or baked vegetables
Beer battered fish and chips High in unhealthy polyunsaturated fats Grilled or baked fish/prawns and salad
Alcohol Energy dense Soda with lime cordial/fresh lime
Sushi High in refined carbohydrates and sugar Fresh Vietnamese rice paper rolls
Bacon and egg roll High in saturated fat Frittata

 

 

By Sophie Scott, Senior Online Trainer – Diploma of Nutrition and Dietetics for PTs.
Sophie is passionate about nutrition, fitness and inspiring people to live life to the fullest. She is a qualified nutritionist and personal trainer and teaches a range of group fitness classes from yoga and pilates to Zumba and Bootcamp. Sophie started teaching at a gym in Vanuatu, then moved to Wellington in New Zealand where she ran her own business, Fit and Fed, focusing on women’s health and fitness. She is now a senior trainer for the Diploma of Nutrition and Dietetics for Personal Trainers. Sophie has over 10 years’ experience in the education field, initially working in the area of environmental education, assisting people green up their lives. Sophie loves ocean swimming and group ex classes and is also an alumni ambassador for Lululemon athletica.

Qualifications: 
Bachelor of Environmental Science (Hons.)
Advanced Diploma of Nutritional Medicine
Certificate II and IV in Fitness
Certificate IV Training & Assessment

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